December Theme: Honor

Copyright © 2007-2010 by World Dragon Kenpo. All rights reserved.
Blog design copyright © 2007-2010 by Steve Amoia. All rights reserved. The blog template was provided by Google Blogger.

"Everything begins in the mind. Create the intention and then apply the effort to receive the result."

"It is very easy to break a pencil in half. Breaking ten pencils in half is an altogether different matter."

--- Coach Ron Pfeiffer, 7th Degree Black Belt, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin USA


"Don't fear the person who has studied a thousand techniques one time. Fear the person who has studied one technique a thousand times."

--- Ed DellaCroce, 3rd Degree Black Belt and the North Carolina State Director for World Dragon Kenpo.


December Theme: Honor.

The Example of Staff Sergeant Salvatore A. Giunta

“I lost two dear friends of mine. I would give this back in a second to have my friends with me right now.”

Featured Video




Monday, February 11, 2008

February 2008 Slayer News

SLAYER NEWS
About Dragon Kenpo Karate
February 2008 Mentoring

“Pity the student who does not surpass his teacher.” Leonardo da Vinci

Table of Contents

Opening Comments by Coach Ron Pfeiffer
The Importance of the WDK Review Process by Coach Ron Pfeiffer
Featured Article: The Ten Evasive Steps
by Jerry Munday
Mentoring from the Heart by Phoebe Nelson Oshirak, RN
Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Common Cold by Steve Amoia
Closing Comments by Coach Ron Pfeiffer
Staff Biographies Link


Opening Comments by Coach Ron Pfeiffer

A note about the upcoming Nunchaku E-Book, "The Way of the Flexible Styx, Vol. 1."

During the last few months our team has been working on an update to our current nunchaku training program. Many of our students have benefited from the Nunchaku CD Rom which is still available for our members.

The new e-book will detail the CD Rom's training and when Vol. 2 is released, it will contain what may be considered a "master level" training Kata (form or pattern).

We had so much material to put together that we decided to split it into two releases. Anyone who has suggestions or comments please feel free to contact me or Steve Amoia. Due to the detail in the books, we are shooting for an initial release of mid-Summer.

Meanwhile, here is a video sample for our members, instructors and associates to enjoy.

Coach Ron Pfeiffer

Reminder

Occasionally, our members have asked what's the best way to help others learn about our school and program. K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Students! Just refer them to one of our websites, as some of you know we have a few. Also, our school depends on member referral to grow. Our tuition is the lowest of any school because we don't have advertising expenses, etc. Use these links for referrals:

www.dragonkenpo.us

www.dragonkenpo.net

www.onlinekarate.net

www.onlinekarate.bravehost.com

Coach Ron Pfeiffer can be contacted at dragonkenporegister@yahoo.com

"Leaders are like eagles. They don't flock. You find them one at a time." Coach Knute Rockne

The Importance of the WDK Review Process
By Coach Ron Pfeiffer

Often, when new members join WDK, they ask to be certified without reviewing our entire series of videos. I recognize that many new students have significant martial arts training; however, I would like to address this issue from my perspective as the owner and head instructor.

I do understand and respect how proud you are of your prior accomplishments. Please understand that going through the review process means coming to an understanding of how World Dragon Kenpo presents the training. You are one of many who have been asked to patiently review, and therefore, be honestly aware of all that WDK teaches. How would you like to represent someone or something and find out that you couldn't answer a question being unaware of certain differences? Original DK paved the foundation and, WDK has built a school upon it.

Secondly, how many (that you know of) have offered to sign certificates of rank for people (just send in the money that is somewhat like just add water) who they know almost nothing about? How easy to fill the wall with paper.

As other new members from other DK disciplines complete the review, they hold a certificate they are proud of and know they worked for. The review isn't difficult and as you go on, you might just see something new. But truly a bit of sacrifice and effort make for strong members who are a credit to our school. They know that others who enter won't be given a "special deal," and the standards for those claiming higher rank will be upheld.

It's an individual decision. I do know of programs and associations which grant rank like candy. I've been offered the bribes myself; they mean nothing. I'd rather be a Brown Belt that my students respect than an Nth Degree Black Belt who paid too much for paper that won't even start a fire in my imagination...

Excuse me for becoming long-winded here, but the ideals behind our school and the proud membership who guard it deserve no less, and neither do any of you.

As Bruce Lee famously said, “I don’t wear a belt. A belt holds up my pants.”

Coach Ron Pfeiffer can be contacted at dragonkenporegister@yahoo.com

“Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.” Coach Vince Lombardi

The Ten Evasive Steps
by Jerry Munday, Florida State Director of WDK

(Editor’s Note: Mr. Munday has earned the following ranks).

1st degree Black belt in Chun Li Chaun Fa Difficult Clinging Fist under Soke John Stover.

1st degree Black belt in Arnis under Grand Master Bram Frank.

2nd degree Black belt in Kenpo/Arnis under Kenpo/Arnis Founder Master George Denson.

3rd degree Black belt in Kenpo Karate under Ed Hutchison.

4th degree Black belt in Dragon Kenpo under Hap Ki Mu Sul Founder Rodney Lacy.

Everyone knows that the best way to deal with an on coming punch is to not be there when it arrives. The 10 Evasive Steps exercise is designed to train you to make that first necessary move into an offensive defensive reaction to a first punch thrown. What you do after this is always dictated by the particular situation you are in.

For those who are practicing the No Touch system, it is necessary to talk about hand positions at this point. Hand positions are vital for proper balance. In the case of children who can’t be seen using their hands aggressively, I employ the prayer hand position. It looks just like it sounds. The hands held together near the chin with the elbows close to the ribs, as if you are praying. The use of the prayer hand position can not be construed as anything but non-violent, and non-aggressive, while bringing the hands into effective placement for future defensive and offensives uses. This is extremely important for children. Raising the hands to indicate reluctance to engage in a fight is technically effective however it often sends a message of weakness to the attacker, and this is really what playground fights are all about.

Child rules of order are very simple, and just as simple to deal with, since these rules are based on emotional and physical intimidation.

Being able to stand your ground and being untouchable is very empowering to kids. I will elaborate on this in a later article on controlling your fear. In concert with this it is also very important to emphasize to the child never to turn his/her back to their opponent. Turning your back is also a sign of weakness, and limits your ability to see another oncoming punch. The act of throwing punches also removes energy from the body faster than evading. Try this yourself, by standing far enough away from each other so that one of you can throw a series full power punches while the other simply slides and steps. See for yourself who lasts longer.

The 10 Evasive Steps exercise is laid out as follows:

Refer to the diagram as needed:


Evasion #1

From a right punch raise your guard and step off to the outside of the attacker at a 45 degree angle. (Remember that the direction you end up facing depends on what your next move should be, which will always be situation dependent.)

Evasion #2

From a left punch raise your guard and step off to the outside of the attacker at a 45 degree angle.

Evasion #3

From a right punch perform a right hand brush followed by a left hand push and step off to the outside of the attacker at a 90 degree angle.

Evasion #4

From a left punch perform a left hand brush followed by a right hand push and step off to the outside of the attacker at a 90 degree angle.

Evasion #5

From a right punch perform a left hand brush to the attacking hand and sweeping back with the right leg away from the attacker at a 45 degree angle.

Evasion #6

From a left punch perform a right hand brush to the attacking hand and sweep back with the left leg away from the attacker at a 45 degree angle.

Evasion #7

From a right round punch (some know this as a street punch) step forward raising your guard to the inside of both the attacker’s right forearm and biceps.

Evasion #8

From a left round punch step forward raising your guard to the inside of both the attacker’s right forearm and biceps.

Evasion #9

From a right straight punch perform a left hand brush followed by a right hand push while stepping straight backwards.

Evasion #10

From a left straight punch perform a right hand brush followed by a left hand push while stepping straight backwards.

This exercise should first be practiced statically with the attacker remaining stationary until the basic movements can preformed without thinking. Once you have become proficient with this static exercise you should practice it dynamically (both partners moving). Then as right left punch combinations. At the beginner phase of this exercise start by simply raising your guard bringing both your hands up to your face, this preps your hands for grabs takedowns, and punches.

Jerry Munday can be contacted at modular_kenpo@yahoo.com

“Those having torches will pass them on to others.” Greek Proverb

Mentoring from the Heart


By Phoebe Nelson Oshirak, RN and Tai Chi Student

By definition, a “mentor” can mean many things. To name a few: Teacher, Trainer, Instructor, Tutor - Coach, Professor, Preceptor, Guide - Counselor, Parent, Advisor, Advocate and more. Perhaps the word Mentor means all of those titles rolled into one. This month, in our newsletter, we would like to pay tribute to those who mentor.

It is a selfless endeavor that more often than not, brings with it its own reward; knowing their investment has made a positive difference in the life of another human being. All who mentor strive to:

M _ Make every minute count. It is all about quality not quantity.

E _ Enjoy the mentoring experience and the enlightenment it brings.

N_ Nurture the relationship. Establish mutual respect and trust.

T_ Teach strong values; encourage self-discipline.

O_ Offer the gift of your time often and willingly.

R_ Reach out to those less fortunate. Help them to help themselves.

So let’s say a heartfelt Thank You to all of you who take time out of your own hectic lives to mentor others. You know who you are, and you deserve it. ♥

Phoebe Nelson Oshirak can be contacted at Ophoebe0077@aol.com

“People may not remember what you said, but they will always remember how you made them feel.” Maya Angelou

Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Common Cold
By Steve Amoia

Video of TCM herbal prescriptions courtesy of YouTube.

As we all know, this is cold and flu season. A visit to your neighborhood pharmacy or retailer will present you with dozens of choices to cure what ails you. Or you may have a time-tested remedy of your own. But what about an alternative approach? Let’s see what Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) tells us about colds and flu.

Two Types of Colds

In TCM, a cold is explained by the absorption of too much wind by the body. In the Chinese system, there are two types of colds caused by pathogens that invade the bodily defenses:

Wind Cold

  • Development of a fever.
  • Bodily chills.
  • Sinus congestion with a clear discharge.
  • Upper body stiffness and headaches.

“For example, when the symptoms include strong chills, inability to sweat, wheezing, and stiff neck, the classic and ancient remedy is Ephedra Decoction (Ma Huang Tang). The chief herb in this formula is Ephedra (ma huang). It also contains cinnamon twig, apricot seeds, and licorice. Ephedra is never used by itself in Chinese herbal therapy; it is always part of a formula, often combined with licorice (as in Ephedra Decoction), which tones down its harsh nature. Ephedra, used alone, is very dangerous, as it can raise blood pressure. Do not use this formula if you have heart disease or hypertension. And do not exceed the recommended dosage.

For symptoms of wind cold with headache and nasal congestion as the chief symptoms, the classic formula is Chuan Xiong Cha Tiao Wan, with green tea, which moves the action of the formula to the head area.” (1)

Wind Heat

  • A fever that is more prevalent than chills.
  • Sore throat and headaches.
  • Dry cough with yellow discharge.

“For wind heat, Chinese doctors typically prescribe herbal formulas containing chrysanthemum flowers, mulberry leaf, mint, peppermint, honeysuckle, forsythia buds, burdock seed, and licorice.

Numerous formulas are available in Chinese Medicine to treat the many variations of this condition. The most commonly used is a formula called Yin Qiao San. It is used for treating influenza, tonsillitis, and the common cold, is available as the patent formula Yin Qiao lie nu Pian.” (2)

OTC Chinese Option

Cold Signoff TM (Yin Qiao Jie Du Wan) is a product sold by ActiveHerb.com to prevent colds and influenza. You may find many herbal remedies on this web site, and learn more about Chinese alternatives to Western ailments.

“In a clinical study involving 1480 people, only 2.6% of people who took Yin Qiao Jie Du Wan for 6 weeks developed flu whereas 17.55% people in the control group developed flu. We recommend to use Cold SignoffTM for prevention of colds or flu when an outbreak occurs in the community, the family or the working places.” (3)

Acupuncture and Acupressure

The art of Acupuncture can alleviate cold and flu symptoms, and also hasten the body’s natural immunity against future attacks. There is also an acupuncture point that can be manually massaged to provide relief:

“Acupuncture points along the lung and large intestine meridians are often used as they activate the immune function in the body.

The most important acupuncture point in treating the common cold is Large Intestine 4. This point is located in the web between the thumb and index finger. This point is very effective for this condition, since it suppresses pain and relieves exterior conditions. Patients frequently experience quick relief when the point is needled or massaged.” (4)

References

(1, 2, and 4). Holistic Online: Chinese Medicine for Cold.

(3) ActiveHerb.com: Cold Signoff.

Steve Amoia can be contacted at info@sanstefano.com

"Besides pride, loyalty, discipline, heart and mind, confidence is the key to all the locks." Coach Joe Paterno

Closing Comments by Coach Ron Pfeiffer

If you have an article that you would like to submit, you may respond to me or Steve Amoia. Comments and questions about our publication are encouraged via the interactive nature of our blog. Or you can direct them to me by email. Please proofread your submissions, and shorter rather than longer articles are preferred. WDK reserves the right to edit any submission.

Important Notice To All Members

All Student/Instructor members are reminded that advancement and promotion are not automatic. Contact Coach Pfeiffer or your local instructor if you have questions or to request advancement information.

Is your school having an event? Let the Dragon Kenpo community know by placing it in the Slayer News! We are here to help you and your students get the most out of your training.

Please remember to keep your information updated so that the World Dragon Kenpo Schools of Self Defense can serve you in the best way possible!

The articles within this newsletter are the views of the writer and not necessarily the views of World Dragon Kenpo Schools of Self Defense.

Coach Ron Pfeiffer can be contacted at dragonkenporegister@yahoo.com

Staff Biographies Link

For a link to our Slayer News Staff Biographies, please click here.

Thursday, February 7, 2008

Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Common Cold



Video of TCM herbal prescriptions courtesy of YouTube.

As we all know, this is cold and flu season. A visit to your neighborhood pharmacy or retailer will present you with dozens of choices to cure what ails you. Or you may have a time-tested remedy of your own. But what about an alternative approach? Let’s see what Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) tells us about colds and flu.

Two Types of Colds

In TCM, a cold is explained by the absorption of too much wind by the body. In the Chinese system, there are two types of colds caused by pathogens that invade the bodily defenses:

Wind Cold

  • Development of a fever.
  • Bodily chills.
  • Sinus congestion with a clear discharge.
  • Upper body stiffness and headaches.

“For example, when the symptoms include strong chills, inability to sweat, wheezing, and stiff neck, the classic and ancient remedy is Ephedra Decoction (Ma Huang Tang). The chief herb in this formula is Ephedra (ma huang). It also contains cinnamon twig, apricot seeds, and licorice. Ephedra is never used by itself in Chinese herbal therapy; it is always part of a formula, often combined with licorice (as in Ephedra Decoction), which tones down its harsh nature. Ephedra, used alone, is very dangerous, as it can raise blood pressure. Do not use this formula if you have heart disease or hypertension. And do not exceed the recommended dosage.

For symptoms of wind cold with headache and nasal congestion as the chief symptoms, the classic formula is Chuan Xiong Cha Tiao Wan, with green tea, which moves the action of the formula to the head area.” (1)

Wind Heat

  • A fever that is more prevalent than chills.
  • Sore throat and headaches.
  • Dry cough with yellow discharge.

“For wind heat, Chinese doctors typically prescribe herbal formulas containing chrysanthemum flowers, mulberry leaf, mint, peppermint, honeysuckle, forsythia buds, burdock seed, and licorice.

Numerous formulas are available in Chinese Medicine to treat the many variations of this condition. The most commonly used is a formula called Yin Qiao San. It is used for treating influenza, tonsillitis, and the common cold, is available as the patent formula Yin Qiao lie nu Pian.” (2)

OTC Chinese Option

Cold Signoff TM (Yin Qiao Jie Du Wan) is a product sold by ActiveHerb.com to prevent colds and influenza. You may find many herbal remedies on this web site, and learn more about Chinese alternatives to Western ailments.

“In a clinical study involving 1480 people, only 2.6% of people who took Yin Qiao Jie Du Wan for 6 weeks developed flu whereas 17.55% people in the control group developed flu. We recommend to use Cold SignoffTM for prevention of colds or flu when an outbreak occurs in the community, the family or the working places.” (3)

Acupuncture and Acupressure

The art of Acupuncture can alleviate cold and flu symptoms, and also hasten the body’s natural immunity against future attacks. There is also an acupuncture point that can be manually massaged to provide relief:

“Acupuncture points along the lung and large intestine meridians are often used as they activate the immune function in the body.

The most important acupuncture point in treating the common cold is Large Intestine 4. This point is located in the web between the thumb and index finger. This point is very effective for this condition, since it suppresses pain and relieves exterior conditions. Patients frequently experience quick relief when the point is needled or massaged.” (4)

References

(1, 2, and 4). Holistic Online: Chinese Medicine for Cold.

(3) ActiveHerb.com: Cold Signoff.